Edition: English | Español Français العربية Pусский | 中文简体 中文繁体 Монгол
Homepage > Culture Video

Sculptors re-imagine Emperor Qin's warriors

CCTV.com

10-14-2016 17:57 BJT

A unique exhibition of sculptures, loosely based on China’s ancient Terracotta Warriors, has opened in London for its sole UK showing. The exhibition’s unique in that it’s the work of artists from all the European Union’s 28 nations and three from China, reflecting a modern cross-cultural view of Chinese art-work that dates back more than 2,000 years.

A unique exhibition of sculptures, loosely based on China’s ancient Terracotta Warriors, has opened in London for its sole UK showing.

A unique exhibition of sculptures, loosely based on China’s ancient Terracotta Warriors, has opened in London for its sole UK showing.

Entitled ‘Dialogue with Emperor Qin’s Warriors,’ Richard Bestic in London went along to view a remarkable take on as China’s ‘Eighth Wonder of the World.’

All the artworks here took as their inspiration China’s Terracotta Warriors. Viewed through the prism of the 21st century.

Twenty-eight European sculptors and three Chinese, re-imagining art works from the earliest days of the Chinese nation.

"The exhibition itself is a way of looking at the cross-border and the cross pollination of ideas that can come together under one roof, which brings people together, brings cultures together and actually also bring together identity, even though all different parts of the EU are different, it can actually be accommodated within the auspices of an exhibition such as this one," said John Atkin, curator of "Qin's Warriors Re-imagined".

Perhaps not surprisingly, the Chinese sculptors were the ones to hear loudest the echoes of Emperor Qin’s China loudest.   Yun Gang Chen work reflecting on a warrior at rest.

Shao Jun Wang’s image of a ‘Veteran’ more reminiscent of a scholar than a warrior. While Kun Zhang’s Sound from Heaven hints at the birth of a new nation.

From Europe, the sculptor Martynas Gaubas from Lithuania leans toward humor and his Peacemaker in bronze and wood.   Complete with peace medals on his chest.

Others took a more classical view: Latvia’s Aigars Bikse’s work Peace for the World; Luxembourg’s Marie Josee Kershchen and from Malta Anton Grech’s Drone Warrior.

All the artists first travelled to Xi’an in Shaanxi Province in Central China to respond first hand to the remarkable Terracotta Warriors.

Rediscovered in 1974 after lying undisturbed in the ground for more than 2,000 years, they were one of the great archeological triumphs of the 20th century.

The 6,000 or so figures formed the core of Emperor Qin’s tomb, lying alongside horses, chariots, weaponry and even terracotta acrobats to entertain in the after life the man who founded China.

Qin a political and cultural titan, implemented a standard written script for his new nation, something Portuguese artist Jose de Guimaraes reflected in his piece, Xian Warrior using wood; neon and lead.

Art of course transcends language and time. The idea here to celebrate the diversity of heritage that according to the exhibition’s organizers , all humanity shares.

Follow us on

  • Please scan the QR Code to follow us on Instagram

  • Please scan the QR Code to follow us on Wechat