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Robotic kitchen recreates dishes by top chefs

CCTV.com

10-14-2016 00:21 BJT

Imagine enjoying food made by some of the world's top chefs from the comfort of your own home. What's claimed to be the world's first robotic kitchen "learns" a chef's movements then carefully replicates their dishes in minute detail. It looks like Thermomix is about to get some serious competition.

It may not look like it, but in this London kitchen a master chef is at work. Moley Robotics' fully-automated and integrated intelligent cooking robot is busily making chef Tim Anderson's crab and tomato soup.

Moley Robotics

Moley Robotics' fully-automated and integrated intelligent cooking robot is busily making chef Tim Anderson's crab and tomato soup.

Having watched and analysed how Anderson makes the dish, it's now replicating his movements down to the finest detail.

It's all part of London-based Moley Robotics' aim to revolutionise home cooking with the power of automation, allowing robotic versions of top chefs to craft dishes in kitchens around the world.

"Before this machine came into the market, nobody can understand that it's possible to build a machine which generally can cook any dish in the world, because it looks impossible before we are inventing this kitchen. Now, it's possible," said Mark Oleynik, Founder & CEO, Moley Robotics.

This is Moley's vision of a future robotic kitchen. Its technology gives homeowners unlimited access to chefs and their recipes, which are then precisely recreated by the two-armed robot.

But there is one draw back - while the robotic kitchen's arms closely mimic those of a chef, it certainly can't taste or test the food.

That means it can't check to see if more seasoning is required, like adding a little salt or pepper. But Oleynik says that's not an issue.

"The machine can do much more than you can do individually, because the machine can collect the knowledge from a lot of individuals and transfer it to your flat," he said.

"So, I think in terms of results, it's definitely very unique. There is not any way to do it without this machine."

Now that the crab soup is completed, what does it actually taste like? And are regular consumers willing to eat food made by a robot?

"It's like a really good crab bisque. Perfectly seasoned, not too salty, I always thought it was but it was actually perfect to my tastes," barista William Pitts said.

Moley Robotics hopes to launch its first consumer model prototype by next year.

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