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South Sudanese refugee uses music to call for reconciliation

Reporter: Hillary Ayesiga 丨 CCTV.com

12-09-2016 00:39 BJT

A South Sudanese refugee living in Uganda is using music to encourage peace in his home country. The conflict in his country has forced thousands to flee. Even though he's no longer living in South Sudan, Prince Moses Lupai is determined to use his musical talents to spread the message of peace. 

Prince Moses Lupai is a former banker-turned-musician.

He's among the thousands of people who've fled their homes in South Sudan due to ongoing violence and deadly clashes.

As he settles into Uganda as a refugee, Lupai's pursuit for peace has taken him to a recording studio in Kampala.

Prince Moses Lupai is determined to use his musical talents to spread the message of peace.

Prince Moses Lupai is determined to use his musical talents to spread the message of peace.

"It has been a nightmare because there is no peace in my country and the time is going, I am worried. Most of my songs are about cry, cry, cry so it has been very challenging in that manner but I still have hope that the future is bright," he said.

Through his lyrics of peace, Prince Lupai is trying to reach out to the warring parties in the South Sudan. He believes this message of hope could end gun violence in his country and also usher in development.

Lupai has been performing since 2006.

His music reflects on social challenges, while highlighting the importance of peace.

Some of his songs have been banned back home.

But online platforms are helping get his message out there.

"Now that the social media is popular, when the radio stations are not playing such music we can still play them through the social media,youtube, share it on facebook. Such kind of messages I offer them free to government officials, I need them to hear that. So at the end of the day the message is passed," he said.

Lupai also organises concerts for other South Sudanese refugees living in Uganda, appealing for reconciliation.

"We need to rethink how we got this country, it has been so challenging our people died 20 years in the bush, no development and then five years down we again spoil the chance but there is still room," Lupai said.

Thousands of refugees flee across the border into Uganda every day.

Lupai says he'll continue to advocate for peace and reconciliation through the global language of music, until it's safe for him - and all other South Sudanese refugees -- to return home

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